Range Rover: Classic edge with electric motor

Range Rover: Classic edge with electric motor

The British SUV Range Rover Classic, which was built from 1970 to 1994, is a real cult car and collector’s item. A British company specializing in classic electric cars wants to bring the Range Rover Classic into the 21st century – with an electric drive.

The company Lunaz from the British Formula 1 city of Silverstone has made a name for itself with the conversion of classic vehicles into electric cars . After having electric versions of the 1961 Rolls-Royce Phantom V and Jaguar XK120 in their portfolio, a real off-road legend is to be added from 2021: the first generation of the Land Rover Range Rover.

Range Rover: Classic edge with electric motor

Range Rover: Classic edge with electric motor

The conversions at Lunaz are not exactly over the knee: Every single Range Rover is “redesigned from the ground up”, starting with a thorough inspection and precise weighing of every corner of the vehicle in order to determine the ideal chassis setup and drive design. Each vehicle is then 3D scanned and mapped as a CAD model “to ensure technical perfection in every step of the process”. After that, the classic British SUVs are dismantled to the bare metal so that any body defects can be fixed before the restoration and conversion processes begin.

Electric Range Rover: Customers can choose from two versions

Customers can choose between two versions: “Town” and “Country”. The electric Range Rover “Town” should shine as a car that is more intended for the eponymous cities, above all with comfort for the driver and passengers in the back seat. The “Country” specification, on the other hand, is intended to encompass a complete package of technical, technological and design features that enable their drivers to have a classic – but fully electric – off-road experience. Both variants will be available with a long or short wheelbase, reports the British mobility portal Autocar.

Classic car with electric drive

In the interior, buyers of the electric Range Rover Classic have further options: each car is tailored to the individual wishes of its owner, with upholstery materials inspired by the original Range Rover option list and with a number of subtly integrated, modern extras such as Infotainment, air conditioning and Wi-Fi.

Special model based on James Bond

Lunaz is also selling a Range Rover convertible under the name “Safari”, which is based on the car that a colleague of secret agent James Bond drove in the 007 film “Octopussy” in 1983. Lunaz describes the Safari as “the world’s first electric SUV without a roof” and, according to its own statement, has already sold the first copy to an unnamed European customer.

So much professionalism and attention to detail, the Lunaz screwdrivers can also be paid for accordingly: The electric Range Rover is initially limited to a series of 50 units, each of which is available from £ 245,000 (around 269,000 euros) plus tax. Deliveries are scheduled to begin in summer 2021.

You can’t make this one mistake 1,500 meters underground

As with all Lunaz projects, the technical specifications of the electric off-road vehicle are a well-kept secret. One thing is certain: As with other models of the British screwdriver, the charging port is behind the original filler neck. The instrument panels will also be adapted to the electric drive and its most important key figures.

Electrification should extend the life of classic cars

By the way, Lunaz had an extremely successful 2020 despite the economically very difficult year caused by the corona pandemic : Despite the pandemic, “extraordinary growth” was recorded and the number of “highly qualified jobs” doubled this year. For 2021, Lunaz is planning a further doubling, promises company founder David Lorenz to the British automobile news agency Newspress UK.

“By 2030, when the UK ban on the sale of cars with internal combustion engines comes into force, there will be 2 billion combustion vehicles in the world. Without the switch to electric cars, this will represent a mass redundancy of finite resources that could otherwise be reused,” explains company founder Lorenz. “Our approach responds to the urgent need to extend the life of such vehicles for future generations.”

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