Honda HR-V Test

All New Honda HR-V Test

Honda HR-V Test – More than a year and a half after its launch in the Japanese market, the new Honda HR-V arrives home to play spoilsport among urban crossover, targeting Peugeot or Renault Captur 2008 but also the Nissan Qashqai . To stand out, he particularly relies on its dynamism and great livability.

Having been a pioneer in the field of urban crossovers with the HR-V first name in 1999, Honda finally decides to make his return this became very flourishing segment. While the Nissan Juke, Renault Captur and Peugeot 2008 are now comfortably on the market and experiencing success envy of many compact or urban, the new HR-V finally arrives on our market, virtually the same time as fellow Mazda CX-3. It is also surprising that Honda has taken so long to react, since this vehicle is already available in Japan for almost 2 years as the vezel. Honda HR-V Test

If the new model is more conventional than its predecessor “Joy Machine” in terms of design, however, it appears quite dynamic style with a profile that tends to cut through a sloping roof and handles rear doors camouflaged. The front inspires some more sporty thanks to its tapered optical and swollen shield. In terms of size, the HR-V takes advantage of clearly dominate its main competitors, with a length of 4.29 m, 16 cm more than Captur. This makes it the largest in its class, ahead of the Opel Mokka and Mazda CX-3 (4.28 m and 4.27 m), and frankly approaches the best-selling Nissan Qashqai (4.38 m), which positioning has always been rather vague. Honda HR-V Test

Honda HR-V Test

These generous measurements obviously benefit the livability of the new HR-V, which is superior to the competition, with a record volume of trunk 470 liters up to 1533 liters when the rear seats folded, and a with generous leg space for rear passengers. In this area, even the Qashqai yet greater, is exceeded.The layout of the fuel tank under the front seats (like the Civic and Jazz) and the famous magical folding rear seats, were obviously useful for both space aboard this crossover, besides that they participate in the modularity of the vehicle.

Inside, we find a well presented plank board, boasting a respectable finish quality, although hard plastics remain very numerous. If one is not at a 2008 or even a CX-3 on this point, we feel nevertheless that efforts have been made. Thus, details such as the shift lever and its semi-floating support benefit from careful processing and provide a report rather upscale. We regret however that the new Honda Connect multimedia system features a 7-inch touch screen, so little intuitive.

Honda HR-V Test

The engine range is currently limited to a diesel and petrol, with the excellent 1.6 i-DTEC 120 hp and the new 1.5 i-VTEC 130 hp. Note that, as French manufacturers and unlike the big brother CR-V, Honda has chosen to offer its HR-V only in tension. We were able to take control of a diesel version with 120 hp, coupled with the 6-speed manual transmission (CVT 7-speed is available only with petrol). If this block still offers the flexibility and reach we knew him on CR-V and Civic, it disappoints here by being very noisy soon as the requests, which causes more vibration in many commands. This defect, which is certainly of a less well cared soundproofing on the other models, is particularly unpleasant when one gets stuck in traffic.

Fortunately, the arrival on small winding roads to forget this and partly reveals the character rather player HR-V. This demonstrated a great agility in bends and combos hardly feel any roll, the small crossover meets the finger and the eye with precise steering and offering a good feeling. Do not spoil, performance is of a good standard (0 ~ 100 km / h in 10.1 s shot) and the level of consumption remains very reasonable (6.5 l / 100 km on average, statements with driving rather sporty on winding roads). In terms of comfort, the picture is more mixed, with a suspension that seems too stiff at low speed and at the same time a little too flexible dynamic driving. However, it would seem, in the opinion of some colleagues, that depreciation is more homogeneous on the petrol version, 80kg lighter compared to diesel (1324 kg unladen in 1.6 i-DTEC against 1241 kg for the i- VTEC).

Honda HR-V Test

With prices starting at € 21,000 in petrol and diesel € 23,300, the HR-V is rather expensive at first. But, as is often the case with the Japanese brand, the model has no actual entry-level version and available only for “big” engines. Besides the equipment is already complete in the first finishing Elegance, including the automatic emergency braking or automatic air conditioning as standard. The HR-V and is clearly the top of the segment. Our test version 1.6 i-DTEC 120 high finish Exclusive Navi is billed for its € 27,620.

All New Honda HR-V Test

In comparison, a Mazda CX-3 SKYACTIV-D 105 4 × 2 finish Selection appears a little less expensive, with a price of € 26,750, but suffers from a slight power deficit. At Peugeot, a 2008 1.6 120 BlueHDi finish Feline Copper virtually demanded € 2,000 less (€ 25,800), while it has a more polished presentation, but can not face the livability plan. Finally, one could oppose our HR-V Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi 110 finish Connect Edition, available at a slightly higher price (€ 28,900). The latter, which is a little less powerful and efficient, is a bit bigger, but it proves at least roomy final, and can only catch up with its more equipment provided.

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